Join us
Advertisement - Studio Two Twelve

THE WITCHES

THE WITCHES

By Felicity Dayhew

THE WITCHES, by Roald Dahl, adapted from the stage play by David Wood, Griffin Theatre Company at the SBW Stables Theatre, 24 September-5 October 2014. Photo of Guy Edmonds and the mouse by Brett Boardman.

 

Before they had Harry Potter they had The Witches.

The Witches is a one-man play adapted from the Roald Dahl novel about a little boy who discovers the secrets of the witches.

I found The Witches funny and dramatic. They did it well using minimal props, but made great use of them. The sound effects went really well with each different part of the story, using things like lightning and background music. Only using the clothes he was wearing as costumes, Guy Edmonds made it seem like he was wearing a thousand different costumes in seconds probably helped by the director Lucas Jervies.

 

Read the rest of this article and comment on it >>

KRYPTONITE

KRYPTONITE

By Polly Simons

KRYPTONITE, Sydney Theatre Company and State Theatre Company of South Australia at Wharf 1, 11 September – 18 October, 2014. Photography by Lisa Tomasetti: above – Ursula Mills and Tim Walter; right – Tim Walter and Ursula Mills.

The year: 1989. The place: a tutorial on a sweaty afternoon at Sydney University, where two students from vastly different backgrounds meet. 

He, Dylan (Tim Walter) is Collaroy-born and bred, supremely confident and more interested in surfing than hitting the books. She, Lian (Ursula Mills) is small and intense; a scholarship student from rural China working long hours to make ends meet, sharing a mattress and a scummy flat with 12 others like her. He is intrigued by her idealism; she is bemused by his apparent lack of concern for his future.

Despite their differences, the flames of romance begins to flicker between them – until Tiananmen Square happens, and after that, nothing is quite the same again.

 

 

Read the rest of this article and comment on it >>

Advertisement

Advertisement - Sydney PEN

WICKED

WICKED

By FELICITY DAYHEW

WICKED, Capitol Theatre, Sydney - playing now. Photography by Jeff Busby: above Lucy Durack and Jemma Rix; right: Maggie Kirkpatrick.

 

You think you know the story of the Wizard of Oz. Think again…

Wicked is the story of Glinda and Elphaba before they became The Good Witch and The Wicked Witch of the West.

Read the rest of this article and comment on it >>

THE LAST CONFESSION

THE LAST CONFESSION

By Polly Simons

THE LAST CONFESSION, Paul Elliott and Duncan C. Weldon, Liza McLean, TRH Productions and Karl Sydow at the Theatre Royal, September 24 – October 12, 2014. Photography by Cylla von Tiedemann: above – the cast; right – David Suchet

 

The Last Confession was already an accomplished frequent flier by the time it landed on our shores. Written by New York local and first time playwright Roger Crane, it debuted at Chichester Festival Theatre seven years ago, played the West End, then hit the high seas, taking in Toronto and Los Angeles before washing up in Perth last month. 

 

 

Read the rest of this article and comment on it >>

OTHER DESERT CITIES

OTHER DESERT CITIES

By Polly Simons

OTHER DESERT CITIES, Ensemble Theatre, September 11 – 18 October 2014, photography by Hawley: above – Diana McLean, Ken Shorter and Deborah Kennedy; right: Deborah Kennedy and Diana McLean.

 

There’s no way the Ensemble Theatre could have predicted that as their production of Other Desert Cities, set during the 2003 Iraq War, was opening, Australia would be staring down the barrel of yet another conflict as it prepares to send troops into the Middle East again.

Read the rest of this article and comment on it >>

Advertisement

Advertisement - Eastside FM

CHILDREN OF THE SUN

CHILDREN OF THE SUN

By Polly Simons

CHILDREN OF THE SUN, Sydney Theatre Company at the Drama Theatre, Sydney Opera House, 8 September-October 25 2014, photography by Brett Boardman: above - Hamish Michael, Justine Clarke, Jacqueline McKenzie, Toby Truslove and Chris Ryan: right - Toby Truslove and Helen Thomson.

 

Ideas jostle and compete for attention in Andrew Upton’s adaption of Children of the Sun.

 

Ideas about the future of the privileged middle class and the importance of science in facing down ignorance and superstition, and ideas which are just as pertinent now as they were in 1862, during the devastating Russian cholera epidemic in which the play is set.

Read the rest of this article and comment on it >>

Select a Page
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next>>